Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Waiting, praying and what God wants

I've got wise friends. One of them told me this in a recent phone call:

"We're so used to the American culture of getting what we want when we want it, that when we pray for a desire for more than a year we think something must be wrong." (Loose paraphrase.)

Maybe God just wants to to pray more.

Abraham Lincoln thought the same thing about the Civil War:
 "The will of God prevails. In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be, wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time. In the present civil war it is quite possible that God's purpose is something different from the purpose of either party -- and yet the human instrumentalities, working just as they do, are of the best adaptation to effect His purpose. I am almost ready to say that this is probably true -- that God wills this contest, and wills that it shall not end yet. By his mere great power, on the minds of the now contestants, He could have either saved or destroyed the Union without a human contest. Yet the contest began. And, having begun He could give the final victory to either side any day. Yet the contest proceeds." (Emphasis mine).

We're interested in the resolution to our trouble or dilemma and we usually want that resolution to happen quickly. I'm not sure God is interested in the same thing. Maybe we're supposed to learn and grow from what we're facing.

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Why I don't use tracts

Some people love their Gospel-tracts. Me? Not so much.

I'm not talking about the bad ones (and trust me, there are some bad ones out there): Literature that is insulting and mean in how it presents the Goodbest news in the world.

But I don't even like to use the good ones.

It has nothing to do with the tract itself, the problem is me. (What's that old break-up line? "It's not you, it's me.")

For me, a tract is a crutch. An easy way out of the difficult work of starting a conversation, caring for someone in that conversation, and directing it to the Gospel.

[There's a difference between a crutch and a tool. If you use a tract so you can talk less or listen less (bigger deal!), then it's a crutch. If you can use a tract to start a conversation or further it towards the Gospel, that's using it as a tool. Go for it.]


Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Knox County Gospel Conversation Training - February 9

Gospel Conversation Training

Saturday February 9, 9am-Noon at The Oaks Church in Dahinda IL.

In Knox County there are 34,000 people living without Jesus in their lives. At least half of them will never set foot in a traditional church. What's it gonna take to bring the Gospel to them? This training will equip and challenge you to share the Gospel and make disciples with the people in your world.

Learn how to:
  • Naturally take a conversation from "Hello" to the Gospel. 
  • Share the Gospel in a simple and effective way. 
  • Help people take their next steps towards Jesus. 
Please contact me to RSVP.  Interested in training but can't make that day? Let me know!

Other upcoming trainings:

Friday, January 11, 2019

Is caring for others "the Gospel"?


So, is caring for others "the gospel"? Is that evangelism? No, not without the spoken message of the gospel of Jesus... We should never confuse meeting physical needs with sharing the gospel. Caring for others represents the gospel, it upholds the gospel, it points to the gospel, it's an implication of the gospel, but it is not the gospel, and it is not equal to the gospel.

Mack Stiles in Marks of the Messenger (pgs 68-69)  eloquently completes my thoughts about free meals without a Gospel conversation.